The Flipped Classroom

As I was researching topics for my blog, I came across a wonderful educational blog with numerous resources.  You can check it out at http://usergeneratededucation.wordpress.com/The Flipped Classroom as described by Jonathan Martin is:

Flip your instruction so that students watch and listen to your lectures… for homework, and then use your precious class-time for what previously, often, was done in homework: tackling difficult problems, working in groups, researching, collaborating, crafting and creating. Classrooms become laboratories or studios, and yet content delivery is preserved. Flip your instruction so that students watch and listen to your lectures… for homework, and then use your precious class-time for what previously, often, was done in homework: tackling difficult problems, working in groups, researching, collaborating, crafting and creating. Classrooms become laboratories or studios, and yet content delivery is preserved (http://www.connectedprincipals.com/archives/3367).

A compiled resource page of the Flipped Classroom (with videos and links) can be found athttp://teachingwithted.pbworks.com/w/page/37315118/Flipping-the-Classroom

Recording a lecture or providing notes on-line seems be a great idea.  Of course, there are problems like no computer at home, no Internet, or no parental support to do homework.  Nonetheless, it seems like an idea worth exploring.  I know I don’t have all of the answers right now, and my fellow teachers can help brainstorm solutions to possible problems.  Right now my head is spinning with ideas.

For example, I have created some power point presentations to add a visual to a lecture on historical information for a novel.  However, instead of using class time for the lecture, I could use the time to have kids explore the effects of the novel on the time period.  Did To Kill A Mockingbird help change people’s views on stereotypes and racism?

Teachers, please share some ideas and I will post them.

 

 

 

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